To girls: “This is your brain on princess, this is your brain on engineering.”

Sweet, strong, brave, learning young women: you are valuable, unique and adequate, just as you are. Self-love can take time, and that’s a-ok. I know that what boys think feels important, but I promise that what you think of yourself is more important. 

Love you lots,

The Generation Just Ahead of You

Yes. Be yourself :)
mia-the-wonder-slut:

interruptmag:

By 13 years-old 53% of girls say they are unhappy with their bodies. When were we happy? Marie C. photographed and interviewed 4-8 year old girls and asked them what they liked about their bodies to find out.



mia-the-wonder-slut:

interruptmag:

By 13 years-old 53% of girls say they are unhappy with their bodies. When were we happy? Marie C. photographed and interviewed 4-8 year old girls and asked them what they liked about their bodies to find out.



mia-the-wonder-slut:

interruptmag:

By 13 years-old 53% of girls say they are unhappy with their bodies. When were we happy? Marie C. photographed and interviewed 4-8 year old girls and asked them what they liked about their bodies to find out.



mia-the-wonder-slut:

interruptmag:

By 13 years-old 53% of girls say they are unhappy with their bodies. When were we happy? Marie C. photographed and interviewed 4-8 year old girls and asked them what they liked about their bodies to find out.



mia-the-wonder-slut:

interruptmag:

By 13 years-old 53% of girls say they are unhappy with their bodies. When were we happy? Marie C. photographed and interviewed 4-8 year old girls and asked them what they liked about their bodies to find out.



mia-the-wonder-slut:

interruptmag:

By 13 years-old 53% of girls say they are unhappy with their bodies. When were we happy? Marie C. photographed and interviewed 4-8 year old girls and asked them what they liked about their bodies to find out.



mia-the-wonder-slut:

interruptmag:

By 13 years-old 53% of girls say they are unhappy with their bodies. When were we happy? Marie C. photographed and interviewed 4-8 year old girls and asked them what they liked about their bodies to find out.



mia-the-wonder-slut:

interruptmag:

By 13 years-old 53% of girls say they are unhappy with their bodies. When were we happy? Marie C. photographed and interviewed 4-8 year old girls and asked them what they liked about their bodies to find out.

mia-the-wonder-slut:

interruptmag:

By 13 years-old 53% of girls say they are unhappy with their bodies. When were we happy? Marie C. photographed and interviewed 4-8 year old girls and asked them what they liked about their bodies to find out.

(via missrep)

The Camp Gyno. Love this ad, this candor, and this girl. 

“when your little girl
asks you if she’s pretty
your heart will drop like a wineglass
on the hardwood floor
part of you will want to say
of course you are, don’t ever question it
and the other part
the part that is clawing at
you
will want to grab her by her shoulders
look straight into the wells of
her eyes until they echo back to you
and say
you do not have to be if you don’t want to
it is not your job
both will feel right
one will feel better
she will only understand the first
when she wants to cut her hair off
or wear her brother’s clothes
you will feel the words in your
mouth like marbles
you do not have to be pretty if you don’t want to
it is not your job”
— Caitlyn Siehl (via ellenkushner)

(via juliagazdag)

Melissa McCarthy responds to her critics, the ones who insult her body in their movie reviews, with empathy and a beautiful understanding of how to be happy. Get it, girl.

“I am a former child, and I haven’t forgotten a thing.”
— Ursula Nordstrom (via womenorgnow)

If I Should Have A Daughter, by Sarah Kay.

A great perspective on how we’d like to help prepare our daughters for what we think and know awaits them. Shared with me by my bestie, who shares the cape, it’s weight, power, and joy.

missrep:

Swedish Toy Catalogue Delightfully Reverses Genders in Toy Ads

“The decision to swap all the genders in its Swedish toy catalogue marks a pretty significant shift for Top Toy, which was called out by a Swedish advertising watchdog for foisting outdated gender roles on boys and girls back in 2008. That same year, Sweden made a national push to promote gender equality in schools, spending some 110 million Swedish crowns ($16.3 million) in an effort that included the introduction of laws requiring teachers to actively help reverse gender stereotypes.” - Jezebel 

What I Want to Tell My Daughter

is that there is something about being a woman that she may never understand. There is pain and humiliation and frustration and confusion and sensitivity and deep emotion in being a woman, and that she may not ever fully understand the what and why of it. I want to tell her that it will be difficult to sort through the conflicted feelings and the prejudices and the assumptions and the well-hidden slights against her. I wish that I could also tell her that it will all be alright, that she will understand it all so perfectly well one day, and that soon others will understand and she will feel less alone. I don’t yet think I can tell her that, though.

I will tell her to make deep bonds with her girlfriends. I will tell her to cling to other women for support and understanding. I will tell her to trust herself and her instincts and to never stop exploring what it means to be a woman, however far away answers seem to be. I will tell her that I understand, that all women understand on some level. I will tell her to write about it, to think about it, and to feel it. I will tell her to be proud of being a woman and to project that proud image of what she genuinely is, as a woman and a person, to the world in hopes that our gender will be less misunderstood. I will tell her to read books by Nicole Krauss, Betty Friedan, Sloane Crosley, the funny women of my generation, the strong women of my mother’s generation, and the even smarter women of her own generation.

I will tell her that this thing, this complicated nest of feeling and thought, created not by her but by those around her, is part of her whether she wants it or not. I will tell her that it is not fair, but that it is part of her and that I understand the pain in that. And we will both hope for the best, and we will do our best, together, with every other woman in the world.

Video interview with 15-year-old blogger and creator of Rookie magazine. She’s a little rock star.